Microsoft Broadcaster

Microsoft Broadcaster

The other day I was poking around the Microsoft’s site for certified professionals and came across a new public service they are testing out. It is a cross between an RSS feed and a magazine subscription.
You select the general technologies as well as specific Microsoft products you wish to get information about, it then generates a list of new and old media regarding these filter values. The list of media options you can get is quite long and includes articles and case studies all the way to virtual labs and web casts. It is a really nice mash up to see some of the content that Microsoft puts out but you might not ever discover.

Right now signup is by invite only, you fill out a little application and they either accept or deny. You can apply at http://www.microsoftbroadcaster.com

My goal is once a week to post a collection of the most unusual as well as most beneficial feeds that come across my broadcaster filters to you. I give my couple cents worth if I have had the time to fully review the material, but many will be posted based on the intro provided.

So here we go:

Bytes by TechNet: John Campbell and Harold Wong on how SharePoint 2010 can help Excel users avoid spreadsheet chaos

Excel Services is a service application that enables you to load, calculate, and display Microsoft Excel workbooks on Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010. Join Harold Wong as he interviews John Campbell, program manager with the Excel Services team for Micr…

Learning Plan for Developing Solutions on Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010

This learning plan is intended to help IT professionals and developers learn how to develop solutions by using Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 and Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010.
Scott’s Comments: I have reviewed this one, and plan on making use of it myself. It provides articles and training coursed in a given order to help you achieve knowledge to develop for SharePoint. I’ll post again with a review of how it did or did not work in ramping me up.

SQL Server 2008 R2: Upgrading SQL Server Business Intelligence Components

Unless you are dealing with a totally new Microsoft SQL Server installation, the upgrade process is clearly an important part of the installation story. In this webcast, we explain what you need to consider when upgrading to Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R


Clinic 10279: What’s New in Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for IT Professionals

This two-hour clinic describes the various benefits that Microsoft SharePoint 2010 offers IT Pros. It describes improvements to the user interface, including the ribbon and enhanced Central Administration console. It also describes features that help you monitor your SharePoint site, such as large list resource throttling, Unattached Content Database Recovery, and the SharePoint Health Analyzer.

HowTo Install SQL Server 2008 R2

Here is the first of what I hope to be a regular part of The Code Attic experience,
a how-to article on something nice and geeky. As I continue to work on building
out my new machine I will document each of the steps I take in creating demos and
development environments.

Before you can develop or start showing demoes data a place to store and keep data
is needed. So after getting the OS up and running (Windows Server 2008 R2 of course)
you need a database. The following are the most straightforward 45 steps I used
to installing SQL Server 2008 R2 Developer addition with Reporting Services and
Analysis Services.

I won’t fully guarantee the steps will work for your setup but it does in mine,
at the very least is should provide some direction for you in your installation.

As always leave thoughts, questions, and tips in the comments.

Fun and luck I send your way.

Machine:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard x64 Windows
    Server 2008 R2 x64

  • Roles:
    • Active Directory Domain Services
    • IIS
    • Application Server
  • Running as virtual machine within VMWarePlayer 3.1.0 build-261024

Steps:

  1. Run the System Configuration Checker, resolve any issues that it detects
  2. Click Installation
  3. Click New Installation or add feature to an existing installation
  4. Enter Product key
  5. Accept license agreement
  6. Setup Support Rule
    • Windows Firewall Warning to resolve
      • The link which you are redirected to is : Configuring the Windows Firewall to All
        SQL Server Access (
        http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc646023(SQL.100).aspx
        )
        1. Assuming that if you are installing SQL Server you have an understanding of the
          purpose of a firewall I will not summarize the opening paragraphs.
        2. In case you were not aware, a default installation of Windows Server 2008 has the
          firewall on by default.
        3. You finally make it to useable information regarding the above error window about
          a third of the way down the article. The section is called “Ports Use By SQL Server.”
          They are kind enough to provide a table that explains each of the ports and there
          use.
        4. Default instances of SQL Server need TCP Port 1433 opened up. If you will have multiple
          named instances running on the machine additional port planning will need to take
          place, and is beyond the scope of this tutorial.
          • TCP port 1434
            • will need to be allowed if you plan to use Dedicated Admin Connections.
            • This feature is not enabled by default and so will not be covered in this tutorial
              as we are looking to build a basic machine with SQL Server 2008.
          • UDP port 1434
            • listens for any SQL Server Browser requests and provides the needed redirect to
              the appropriate TCP port for the named instance.
          • TCP port 443
            • is the default HTTPS port for SQL Server.
        5. Since we will also be installing Analysis Services the are additional ports to consider
          opening in the firewall will be
          • TCP port 2383
            • Standard port for a default Analysis Services installation
          • TCP Port 2382
            • Used only if a named instances of Analysis Services is being used.
          • TCP Port 80
            • If going to use Analysis Services via IIS (i.e. a connection is allowed to be established
              via a URL)
            • PivotTable requires HTTP or HTTPS
          • TCP Port 443
            • If planning to connect via HTTPS
        6. The final SQL piece our base image will have is Reporting Services
          • TCP Port 80
            • Allows for a HTTP (url) connection to be established
            • It is not recommended to use the default World Wide Web Services rule.
          • TCP Port 443
            • Allows for a HTTPS (secure url) connection to be established.
            • Again it is recommended not to use the default Secure World Wide Web Services rule.
        7. Open up the Windows Firewall and enable the abovementioned ports that relate to
          what you plan to install.
  7. You will be asked to enter your product key code, once entered click Next
  8. The Next step is to accept the Microsoft EULA. Feel free to take time to read it,
    I am sure there is many important things listed. Once you have read to your hearts
    content check the ‘I Accept..’ box, and if you wish to help out with the next version
    check the ‘Send feature usage…’ box.
  9. Click Next
  10. For this base image install SQL Server Feature Installation
  11. Click Next
  12. Feature Selection
    • Select the following
    • This feature set will require approximately 5752 MB
  13. Click Next
  14. The Installation Rules will run. There is a total of 24 rules it checks for. My
    system passed 6 of the rules while the remaining 18 were skipped (given a status
    of ‘Not Applicable’)
    • You will need to resolve any Fails before continuing. It is recommended that you
      correct warnings also.
  15. Click Next
  16. Instance Configuration screen
    • You will now be asked to either accept the default name instance or define a specific
      name for the SQL instance.
    • Since we are building out a fairly default machine for development purposes, select
      ‘Default Instance’
  17. Upon clicking Next you will be asked to review the disk space requirements
    for all the features you selected. If the listed drive does not provide enough space,
    then click Back and change the root directory under Instance Configuration.
  18. You will now be on the Server Configuration screen, where you will be required to
    enter the account which will run each service.
  19. Click Next
  20. The next step is the Database Engine Configuration. This step involves setting up
    the authentication mode and the SA account of the instance of SQL Server.
    • Authentication mode select Windows
    • Click Add Current User if you are currently logged in as an account you want to
      have SA privileges
  21. Click Next
  22. Analysis Services Configuration is the next step. This step is used to setup the
    administrators for Analysis Services.
    • Add all the users you wish to define with such a role.
    • Click Add Current User if the currently logged in user should be granted such permissions.
  23. Click Next
  24. Report Services Configuration is the last of the service configuration steps.
    • Select the top option “Install the native mode default configuration”
  25. Click Next
  26. If you would like to supply error reports to Microsoft check the box.
  27. Click Next
  28. Installation Configuration Rules will run. There is a total of 8 rules which will
    be checked.
    • My system resulted in 6 passed rules and 2 listed as Not Applicable
      • The NA rules are: Instance Name and SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services (64-bit) install
        action
  29. Upon clicking Next you will be given a summary of all the options
    and configurations settings chosen in the earlier steps.
  30. Click Install
  31. Everything has installed now it is time to perform some testing.
  32. The quick an dirty is to open up SQL Management Studio and create a database, if
    it creates you are in luck, it works.
  33. For Reporting Services, there are some additional steps.
  34. Try going to the report services link: http://<your
    server name>/Reports.
    • It will normally ask for credentials, at which time enter some credentials.
    • Most likely you will receive the following error message:
      • “SQL Server Reporting Services Error User <domain>\<name> does not have
        required permissions. Verify that sufficient permissions have been granted and Windows
        User Account Control (UAC) restrictions have been addressed.”
    • As you can guess, the user account must be given some permissions to get in.
  35. So you may be wondering how do I get around this issue and what caused it. My understanding
    is how Reporting Services handles the user accounts that are added during installation,
    see step 22.
  36. Even though you may already be logged in as the administrator for the system and
    SQL, you must run Internet Explorer as Administrator
  37. Re-enter the url for Report Server Manager (http://localhost/Reports)
    and you will be see the following
  38. Click Site Settings in the upper right hand corner. You are now
    in the site settings section of Report Server (if you are familiar with Windows
    SharePoint Server 3.0 you will notice some similarities in the setup of the screen.
    (Always nice of them to reuse good ideas.)
  39. On the left hand side click Security
  40. Click New Role Assignment this will take you to the page were new
    users can be added with different level of security (admin or user)
    • Here is a summary of the roles available, paraphrased from ‘User Predefined Role’
      at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms157363.aspx.
    • Role Description
      System Administrator A user has the ability to enable features and set defaults throughout the system.
      In addition, has the ability to set site-wide security, and define role definitions,
      along with manage all jobs.
      System User Only basic server information is viewable to this role group.
    • You need to add at least one user as a System Administrator so that you no longer
      have to run as administrator. For my set-up I will be adding both a system user
      and a system administrator user. This will allow me to have separation of control
      during demoes. I would recommend creating two new user groups on the machine which
      are assigned the appropriate role levels, and then adding the accounts to the groups.
      This will allow you to quickly make changes as new test accounts are created and
      used, along with getting you in the practice of thinking about security in terms
      of groups and not individuals.
    • In addition to setting the system roles you must setup roles for the actual folder/viewing
      level also. To do this return to Home, and click Folder Settings.
      • You will see a similar security setting page as before. Click New Role Assignment
    • As with before either groups or users can be assigned the different roles. Depending
      on you planned strategy it may make since to assign individual users at this level,
      but remember the more individuals you begin assigning, the more difficult administration
      tasks can become.
    • Here is a summary of the roles available, paraphrased from ‘User Predefined Role’
      at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms157363.aspx.
      • Role Description
        Content Manager All item level roles are wrapped into this single role. This means users or groups
        assigned the role are able to grant permissions, define folder structure, and all
        other management abilities of report server content.
        Publisher Grants the ability to add new items to the report server, including new reports
        and folders
        Browser Can run, subscribe, and browse reports. Can be considered a read only permission
        level.
        Report Builder Has the ability to author and edit reports which exist in the Report Builder
        My Reports Allows user to create a personal report workspace (think a SharePoint MySite like
        experience) were they can store and manager reports for personal use.
      • My recommendation is the user assigned the System Administration role at the site
        level should also be granted Content Manager role at this level. While your system
        user level group/user should be given at minimum Browser role, if not more. This
        is your call as to how you plan on using the system.