Create Redirect Rule with PowerShell

This is a follow-up to my recent post showing how quick the creation of a self-signed certificate can be. Now that you have an SSL certificate it is helpful to ensure that all calls to your site go through on SSL. The easiest way to do this ( and save yourself typing time) is to create a Url rewrite rule via IIS’s Url Rewrite Module, https://www.iis.net/downloads/microsoft/url-rewrite.

Ensure Url Rewrite Module is Installed

For redirect rules to be written you need to confirm the module is installed. The best way to do this is to open up IIS, select a web application, and check for the module’s icon.

Url Redirect Rule - Url Rewrite Module Icon

If you do not see the icon, then you will need to install the module before moving on. You can install the module through the Web Platform Installer or the link at https://www.iis.net/downloads/microsoft/url-rewrite.

Run the Create Redirect Rule Script

  1. Download and save as CreateRedirectRule.ps1 from Gist, https://gist.github.com/gillissm/0344c9551e7a8180354544ff5f60e821.
  2. Open a PowerShell command prompt, ensure you are running it as Admin
  3. Change directory to the location you saved to in step 1
  4. At the prompt enter, and complete the requested parameters
    .\CreateRedirectRule.ps1

    Url Redirect Rule -Script with Prompts

    OR you can submit the parameters at run

    .\CreateRedirectRule.ps1 -SiteBinding "coffeehouse.thecodeattic.com" -RuleName "Redirect to SSL"

    Url Redirect Rule -Script in singleline

Script for Reference

Advertisements

Self-Signed Certs in One Command

As security becomes more critical to web based applications the need to test and develop locally with SSL is good practice. Outside of spending mountains of money generating local test environment official SSL Certificates, we can create what is called a ‘Self-Signed’ Certificate.

There are plenty of articles out there that walk through steps to creating a self-signed certificate, some more detailed than others. This post aims to serve two purposes. First, to provide me a future (easy to find) reference point. Secondly, provide helpful information to the fewest number of steps required for creating a self-signed certificate.

Sitecore Fundamentals Install

As a Sitecore developer first (and most of my current teams are Sitecore related) the usage of the Sitecore Fundamentals Install framework will already be on their machine. For those not into Sitecore development, the following additional quick steps will need to be ran.

Setup PowerShell to interact with the Sitecore MyGet feed

  1. Open a PowerShell command prompt, ensure you are running it as Admin
  2. Register the connection to MyGet feed, at the prompt enter
    Register-PSRepository -Name SitecoreGallery -SourceLocation https://sitecore.myget.org/f/sc-powershell/api/v2

    Sitecore Fundamentals - Register Sitecore Gallery

  3. Install the Sitecore Fundamentals module, at the prompt enter
    Install-Module SitecoreFundamentals
  4. PowerShell will ask if untrusted scripts can be ran, enter ‘A‘ and hit Enter.Sitecore Fundamentals -  Accept Untrusted Scripts
  5. Before performing any other steps, and each time before you use the module, you will want to perform a check and update of the module via
    Update-Module SitecoreFundamentals
  6. Confirming everything installed correctly is as easy as running the following command, at time of writing the current version is 1.1.0
    Get-Module SitecoreFundamentals -ListAvailable

    Sitecore Fundamentals - Available Versions

Setup SSL

  1. Ensure your site exists in IIS
  2. Open a PowerShell command prompt, ensure you are running it as Admin
  3. Run the following at the prompt
    Import-Module SitecoreFundamentals
  4. Run the following at the prompt, this will create the self-signed certificate and assign it to your site
    Add-WebFeatureSSL -HostName "ENTER THE HOSTNAME FOR SITE" -RootDnsName "DO_NOT_TRUST_TheCodeAttic"
  5. Enjoy developing securely!!!

Helix Project Creation Script

Creating Helix Solutions and Modules with PowerShell

Helix is a set of overall design principles and conventions for Sitecore development, put forth by Sitecore in hopes of providing the community a path toward standardized solution development. As noted in the official documentation:

Helix provide a set of guidelines for your Sitecore projects. The Habitat example provides you with a pre-built and tested set of common modules that you can use as an inspiration to your project. Both improve the efficiency of your projects, reduce costs and time to market. As more and more people and organisations adopt the Helix conventions and principles, it will become a Sitecore standard. This means that people who are familiar with the conventions or the Habitat example will be able to work more easily on other convention-based projects with minimal training. It will be easier for Sitecore Product Support to understand projects built using the conventions, enabling them to resolve issues more quickly. Sitecore will test its software using the conventions so any compatible project that has been implemented for a customer will be more reliable. And since Sitecore will test its software using the conventions, Sitecore will be able to provide better guidance on how to update and upgrade existing Sitecore projects when new versions and new products are released.

(“Why be interested at all in Helix or Habitat?“, http://helix.sitecore.net/introduction/what-is-helix.html#why-be-interested-at-all-in-helix-or-habitat, April 16, 2018)

Some Basic Principles

Before we can dig into the script and creating Helix based solutions and modules, I want to reference some basic principles from the Helix documentation.

A Module is a conceptual grouping of assets which relates to a business requirement. For example, when the company asks that their Sitecore solution contains website search, all assets, business logic and configuration relating to search belongs to the Search module.

In technical terms, project often refers to Visual Studio project, but conceptually can also to the process of implementing the business requirements into an implementation.

The layer concept in Helix supports the architecture by making the dependency flow completely clear everywhere in the solution, in Sitecore, in Visual Studio and even in the file system. Furthermore, the layers provide a structure that is extremely suitable for creating and maintaining solutions of any size and steers both new and experienced developers to producing more maintenance-friendly and clean code. Layers helps control the direction of dependencies the importance of which is described by the Stable Dependencies Principle or SDP, which is one of the cornerstone principles in Modular Architecture:

Helix - Dependencies Direction

File System and Solution Layout

In the Helix documentation, (and a review of the sample Habitat site) one will find a very specific recommended (if not expected) layout and naming of folders both in the Visual Studio Solution as well as the file system. The uniqueness of this ‘recommended’ layout makes the initial setup of a solution very time consuming and increasingly error prone when you start to deal with adding modules at the different layers. The following two images, taken from the Helix documentation show what the Visual Studio Solution and corresponding file system begin to look like.

Helix - Visual Studio Solution, from Sitecore           Helix - File System, from Sitecore

Helpful but difficult

My team enjoys the flexibility as well as cleanliness of a solution built on the Helix principles. What we find most difficult is the extra leg work required in making the file system as well as the Visual Studio Solution appropriate to meet the principles. Trying to solve this problem has led us to try several solutions available in the Sitecore Community, many function very nicely, but didn’t always meet the needs of my teams. So I setout to solve some of these issues, including :

  • No use of custom templates and files to ease setup across machines
  • Option for serialization project creation
  • Pre-loading basic NuGet packages for a module
  • New projects added into the solution by default

Helix Project Creator PowerShell Module

Enough with the intro stuff and into the meat of what you’ve come looking for…a script to ease your Helix headaches and focus on the fun of implementing solutions. TheCodeAttic.Helix.ProjectCreator can be pulled from GitHub at https://github.com/gillissm/TheCodeAttic.Helix.PowerShellProjectCreator.

Setup and Use the Simple Manual Process

The first thing you need to do is retrieve the script from the GitHub repository. As this is hosted on GitHub there are numerous ways you can go about getting things ready to use. In an attempt to make adaption as easy as possible I’ve simplified setup to the following four steps for you:

  1. Open PowerShell command prompt as Admin.
  2. Change the directory to a working/temporary location
  3. Enter the following command
    (Invoke-WebRequest -UseBasicParsing -Uri https://raw.githubusercontent.com/gillissm/TheCodeAttic.Helix.PowerShellProjectCreator/master/ProjectCreatorEasyInstall.ps1).Content | Out-File "ProjectCreatorEasyInstall.ps1"
  4. Then enter
    .\SELRES_09210478-5ac2-4be5-81ef-480eb16e800fSELRES_66c735a3-48ae-4ec2-9967-83d5f083a6f6SELRES_906c181e-dccb-4538-a6c3-1eb25a8f6853ProjectCreatorEasyInstallSELRES_906c181e-dccb-4538-a6c3-1eb25a8f6853SELRES_66c735a3-48ae-4ec2-9967-83d5f083a6f6SELRES_09210478-5ac2-4be5-81ef-480eb16e800f.ps1
  5. Now go implement some awesome Sitecore solutions!

Setup and Configure the Manual Way

As an alternate to the above, you can pull the script from the GitHub repository and load it into Package Manager Console each time you need it with the following steps:

  1. Download from the GitHub repository to your local system in the manner that suits your workflow the best.
  2. Each time you wish to leverage the module in Visual Studio you will need to enter the following in the Package Manager Console
    Import-Module "C:\MyFiles\TheCodeAttic.Helix.PowerShellProjectCreator.psm1"

    Helix - Open Package Manager Console

Manual Process – Full Setup

OR you could download and configure the module manually (this is what ProjectCreatorEasyInstall.ps1 does for you.)

  1. Go to C:\Users\\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Modules
  2. Create a new folder called “TheCodeAttic.Helix.PowerShellProjectCreator”
  3. Download the GitHub repository into the above directory
  4. Go up a level in the file system, should be at C:\Users\\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\
  5. Open (or create) NuGet_profile.ps1
  6. Add the following
    Import-Module TheCodeAttic.Helix.PowerShellProjectCreator
  7. Each time you run Visual Studio the module will be available to use in the Package Console Manager

Using Helix Project Creation

Create a new Helix Solution

  1. Open Visual Studio as Admin
  2. Open the Package Manager Console
    Helix - Open Package Manager Console
  3. Create a new Helix based solution by running Invoke-VisualStudioSolution
    Invoke-VisualStudioSolution -SolutionPath 'C:\Code\Coffeehouse.Demo.SXA'  -SolutionName 'Coffeehouse.Demo.SXA'

    Helix - Open Package Manager Console

Add a new module to a solution

  1. Open Visual Studio as Admin
  2. Open your Solution
  3. Open the Package Manager Console
  4. ‘Wake-up’ the $dte object by running
    $dte.Solution.FullName
    Helix - Wake-up $dte
  5. Add new module by running Invoke-NewModule
    Invoke-NewModule -ModuleName 'Coffeehouse.Demo.SXA.Coupon' -Layer 'Feature' -UseGlass -UseTDS

    Helix - Executing Invoke-NewModule

    Helix - Invoke-NewModule output

    Helix - Invoke-NewModule output, continued

  6. Go write some Sitecore code!!!!

Proof is in the pudding, they say

After running the Invoke-NewModule command your solution explorer should now look like the following:

Helix - New Module in Solution Explorer

And your file system will have the this:

Helix - New Module in File Explorer

References

The Sitecore Community members are always out to help each other, and some other Helix project creation solutions that may fit your work stream better are:

The Easier Way to Sitecore XP 9

This article was originally posted in its entirety on the Paragon Blog here: http://www.paragon-inc.com/blog/sitecore-9-install-the-easy-way.


You’ve either arrived because you made it through the full series or a quick google landed you here as you where looking for a quick and easy Sitecore XP 9 install.

Most of the following was taken from the Sitecore Installation Guide but is a little buried in all the documentation, so this will be a long term refernece for myself, my teams, and now you!

Prerequisites

The Steps

  1. Install MS SQL 2016 SP1 or later
  2. Install Web Deploy 3.6 for Hosting Servers (done via the Web Platform Installer)
  3. Install Url Rewrite 2.1 (done via the Web Platform Installer)
  4. Install Microsoft SQL Server Data-Tier Application Framework (DacFx) version 2016
  5. To support DacFx, the target SQL server needs to allow users and logins at the DB level, this can be configured/confirmed by running the following SQL script
    sp_configure 'contained database authentication', 1;
    GO
    RECONFIGURE;
    GO
  6. Extract the contents of Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (WDP XP0 packages).zip to a working directory. You should see the following
    • Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_single.scwdp.zip
    • Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_zp0xconnect.scwdp.zip
    • XP0 Configuration Files 9.0.1 rev 171219.zip
  7. Extract the contents of XP0 Configuration Files 9.0.1 rev 171219.zip, and you should have the following JSON configuration files, this should be the same directory as the WDP packages in step 6:
    • sitecore-solr.json
    • sitecore-XP0.json
    • xconnect-createcert.json
    • xconnect-solr.json
    • xconnect-xp0.json

    At this point the working directory should look like this:
    Sitecore Easy Install - Working Directory

  8. Open a PowerShell Command prompt as Admin
  9. Change directory to your Working Directory as defined in step 7
  10. Download the install script from Sitecore Easy Install Gist by running the following
    (Invoke-WebRequest https://gist.githubusercontent.com/gillissm/1a3d826e6287e4cd106acea941748643/raw/c59dd9cef02d7e4adec1a90188d099948af43662/SitecoreEasyInstall.ps1).Content | Out-File "SitecoreEasyInstall.ps1"
  11. Open SitecoreEasyInstall.ps1 in your favorite editor (my recommendation is to open the entire working directory in Visual Studio Code).
  12. The first section of the file are global parameters that will define how your environment is configured and installed so update accordingly based on the instructions. At a minimum all values in the ‘CUSTOM TO THE ENVIRONMENT’ section should be completed.
    Sitecore Easy Install - Install Parameters
  13. From the PowerShell prompt run
    .\SitecoreEasyInstall.ps1
  14. Grab some coffee (or beer, I won’t judge) while it runs. (On my machine I was up and runninng in about 10 minutes.)
  15. Enjoy Sitecore Experience Platform 9!!!

 

Experience Sitecore XP

Introduction

There has been a spattering of blogs out there walking through the installation and setup of Sitecore 9. My series has not deviated much beyond many of these. But I feel if I can write about it, explain it, then can claim a certain level of proficiency.

This is the last in the Sitecore Experience Platform install series and at the end of this you should be up and running.

Basic Terminology

As with any new version there is some updated/new terminology used to describe Sitecore and the different elements used for it.

Sitecore is divided into two distinct product areas.

  • Sitecore Experience Management (XM) – the content management and personalization features.
  • Sitecore Experience Platform (XP) – the content management, personalization, marketing and analytics features.

The Sitecore Experience Platform is divided into many logical areas:

  • Sitecore Experience Database (xDB) – where all experience data of the contact is stored.
  • xConnect – an independent service layer that connects the xDB to Experience Applications and allows other channels to add data to the xDB.
  • Experience Applications – with applications such as List Manager, Campaign Manager, FXM, and Experience Analytics.
  • Experience content management – with applications such as the Experience Editor and Experience Explorer
  • Sitecore Installation Framework (SIF) – to PowerShell and JSON based framework for installing Sitecore 9

Topology Options

To better manage the design of a Sitecore installation, there is now better detailed information on the types topology one might use with Sitecore

  • XP0 (XP Single) – Meant for development and testing scenarios. Sitecore Experience Platform is installed as two instances, Sitecore (content management) and xConnect
  • XM1 (XM Scaled) – Installs only the Sitecore Experience Manager elements for Content Delivery and Content Management roles. No xConnect or xDB is installed in this topology.
  • XP1 (XP Scaled) – Performs an installation of the full stack of Sitecore Experience Platform, allowing for each role to be assigned to specific servers.

Environment Needs

The Procedure

This will follow the steps I used to install an XP0 on my local machine for development. This will generate the following for us:

  • The Sitecore stand-alone website that handles content management, content delivery, reporting, and processing.
  • The xConnect and xDB web services.
  • Search indexes on the Solr search engine.
  • A Windows service that runs the Marketing Automation engine.
  • A Windows service that runs the xConnect indexer.
  • The Sitecore content and xDB databases.
  • A self-signed client certificate for secure communication between Sitecore and xConnect.
  • A self-signed server certificate for running HTTPS on the xConnect and xDB web services.

Getting the Basics Ready

  1. Install Solr (a minimum and maximum of 6.6.2 is required), Solr installation does require SSL setup if you follow my instructions for Solr this will be configured for you.
  2. Install Sitecore Installation Framework (SIF), see my article name
  3. Install Sitecore Foundation, see my article name
  4. Install Web Deploy 3.6 for Hosting Servers (done via the Web Platform Installer)
  5. Install Url Rewrite 2.1 (done via the Web Platform Installer)
  6. Install Microsoft SQL Server Data-Tier Application Framework (DacFx) version 2016
  7. To support DacFx, the target SQL server needs to allow users and logins at the DB level, this can be configured/confirmed by running the following
    SQL scriptsp_configure 'contained database authentication', 1;
    GO
    RECONFIGURE;
    GO
    
  8. Extract the contents of Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (WDP XP0 packages).zip to a working directory. You should see the following
    • Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_single.scwdp.zip
    • Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_zp0xconnect.scwdp.zip
    • XP0 Configuration Files 9.0.1 rev 171219.zip
  9. Extract the contents of XP0 Configuration Files 9.0.1 rev 171219.zip, and you should have the following JSON configuration files:
    • sitecore-solr.json
    • sitecore-XP0.json
    • xconnect-createcert.json
    • xconnect-solr.json
    • xconnect-xp0.json

Customizing the Install Configurations

Update the parameters for each configuration file, while updating it is helpful to also include a default value for each parameter to help with future re-use as well as avoiding being prompted during the installation. (I recommend opening the parent folder in Visual Code, to easily access all the files as you work through updating them.)

NOTE: Any paths need to have the slash escaped via doubling it. ‘\’ become ‘\’.

Sitecore 9 Install - Configuration files

Sitecore-Solr.json

The first configuration file does manage is for allowing Sitecore to interact with our Solr install. There are four values of concern in this file.

Sitecore 9 Install - sitecore-solr.json

If you followed my Solr install instructions your values should be:

  1. https://sitecoresolr:8983/solr
  2. “C:\sitecoresolr\solr-6.6.2”, this is the path which the directory sever exists in.
  3. “solr-6.6.2”
  4. “coffeehousexp”

xconnect-createcert.json

Sitecore 9 by default is meant to run as a secure application. This default secure state requires that SSL certificates are trusted and in-place at time of installation, instead of as an afterthought. On a local development machine, this means a self-signed certificate needs to be properly created and trusted.

This can easily be accomplished on a DEVELOPMENT machine via the xconnect-createcert.json file.

Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-createcert.json

  1. Set a name for the certificate, I recommend using the same value as used for your Solr core prefixes for easy identification.
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehouse"
  2. Set the location the newly generated cert was saved, I recommend the same location as all your other install files. (Don’t forget to escape the slashes.)
    "DefaultValue": "C:\Sc9Install"
  3. Set the name of the root certificate.
    "DefaultValue": "SitecoreDevelopmentCert"

Siteocore-XP0.json

Updating sitecore-xp0.json. This file drives the main installation of Sitecore, you’ll note that there a number of items missing ‘DefaultValue’ which we want to complete to allow for easy reproduction.

Sitecore 9 Install - sitecore-xp0.json part 1

  1. Add a new default value pointing to the location of Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_single.scwdp.zip
    "DefaultValue": "C:\Sc9Install\Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (WDP XP0 packages)\Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_single.scwdp.zip"
  2. Add a new default value pointing to your local license file.
    "DefaultValue": "C:\SitecoreVersions\license.xml"
  3. Add a default value indicating the prefix all DBs should be named with. (Hint: make this the same as the solr prefix.)
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehouse"
  4. Add a default value indicating the prefix all DBs should be named with. (Hint: make this the same as the solr prefix.)
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehouse"
  5. Name of the certificate as defined in xconnect-createcert.json, step 1.
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehouse"
  6. Enter the name of your site, for my purposes this will be ‘coffeehouse’.
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehouse"
  7. Opportunity to update that admin password (and drive you nuts during development when you change it now but forget.)
  8. and 9. are easy way to make sure all your connection strings are set accordingly.

The next segment shown of parameters continue the thread of security by allowing unique SQL users and passwords to be generated for each connection string. My only suggestion is to prefix all of these with your site name, so for future cleanup it is easy to remove.
Sitecore 9 Install - sitecore-xp0.json part 2
Sitecore 9 Install - sitecore-xp0.json part 3

In portion 4 of the parameter list we get back to values that require updating for a local environment.

Sitecore 9 Install - sitecore-xp0.json part 4

  1. Set the connection to your SQL Server Instance
    "DefaultValue": "PLW\LOCALSQL2017"
  2. If you have a custom Solr install this value you will need updated.

The final portion of the parameters deal with xConnect.

Sitecore 9 Install - sitecore-xp0.json part 5

  1. Enter the URL that will be used for xConnect connectivity.
    "DefaultValue": "https://xconnect.coffeehouse.com"
  2. Another opportunity to make sure things are secure. (Feel free to skip over for your local setup.)

xconnect-solr.json

This configuration setup should mirror what was done for sitecore-solr.json.

Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-solr.json

If you followed my Solr install instructions your values should be:

  1. https://sitecoresolr:8983/solr”
  2. “C:\sitecoresolr\solr-6.6.2”, like Sitecore-Solr.json this will point to the parent directory of Solr’s server folder.
  3. “solr-6.6.2”
  4. “coffeehousexp” (you should provide the name for your local site, this allows the same Solr instance to be used for all your Sitecore Instances, as each will be named uniquely.)

xconnect-xp0.json

The final file to be updated is for xConnect configuration. A number of these values have been previously set as part of sitecore-xp0.json, in which case the values need to be consistent between the two files.

Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-xp0.json - part 1

  1. Add a new default value pointing to Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_zp0xconnect.scwdp.zip
    "DefaultValue": "C:\Sc9Install\Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (WDP XP0 packages)Sitecore 9.0.1 rev. 171219 (OnPrem)_zp0xconnect.scwdp.zip"
    
  2. Add a new default value pointing to your local license file.
    "DefaultValue": "C:\SitecoreVersions\license.xml"
  3. Name the XConnect instance will be installed as, make sure this is unique to this instance.
    "DefaultValue": "xconnect.coffeehousexp.com"
  4. Name of the certificate as defined in xconnect-createcert.json, step 1.
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehousexp.com"
  5. Add a default value indicating the prefix all DBs should be named with. (Hint: make this the same as the solr prefix.)
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehouse"
  6. Add a default value indicating the prefix all DBs should be named with. (Hint: make this the same as the solr prefix.)
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehouse"
  7. Name of the certificate as defined in xconnect-createcert.json, step 1.
    "DefaultValue": "coffeehousexp.com"

Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-xp0.json - part 2

This next section deals with SQL accounts and passwords.

  1. and 2. Allow for the SQL Admin account to be setup, this will be used for DB creation and access.
  2. Set the Solr URL if it has been changed from the default setup of ‘https://sitecoresolr:8983/solr’
  3. to 7. are the different SQL User Accounts that are created, these need to match any changes made in sitecore-xp0.json.

Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-xp0.json - part 3

The final section contains a mixture of SQL setup as well as final XConnect updates.

  1. to 4. are the different SQL User Accounts that are created, these need to match any changes made in sitecore-xp0.json.
  2. Set the connection to your SQL Server Instance
    "DefaultValue": "PLW\LOCALSQL2017"
  3. Setting the type of configuration that is to be setup for XConnect, possible options are unclear at the time, so we will leave it as is.

Finally, Time to Install

The order of installation is very important as the steps are inter-related.

  1. Open a PowerShell prompt as Admin
  2. Confirm that SIF is fully updated by running
    Update-Module SitecoreInstallFramework
  3. Change directory to the location of your config JSON files.
  4. Run
    Install-SitecoreConfiguration -Path .\configs\xconnect-createcert.json

    Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-createcert.json - Install Output

  5. Run
    Install-SitecoreConfiguration -Path .\configs\xconnect-solr.json

    Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-solr.json - Install Output

  6. Run
    Install-SitecoreConfiguration -Path .\configs\xconnect-xp0.json

    Sitecore 9 Install - xconnect-xp0.json - Install Output

  7. Run
    Install-SitecoreConfiguration -Path .\configs\sitecore-solr.json

    Sitecore 9 Install - sitecore-solr.json - Install Output

  8. Run
    Install-SitecoreConfiguration -Path .\configs\sitecore-XP0.json

Post-Install Sitecore Steps

After all the scripts have successfully ran it is time for a few final post steps to ensure completion.

  1. Login into the admin side of Sitecore, http://local.coffeehousexp.com/sitecore.
  2. User the Admin password you specified in the sitecore-xp.json
  3. From the Launchpad, open Control Panel then click on Indexing Manager
  4. From the modal be sure all indexes are selected and click Rebuild.
  5. Once that completes, we will need to rebuild the Link Database. From the Control Panel click Rebuild Link Databases
  6. Select Master and Core only, and click Rebuild
  7. Next up is a deployment of the Marketing Definitions. Still in the Control Panel click Deploy marketing definitions
  8. From the shown modal make sure everything is selected and click Deploy
  9. Return to the Launchpad and open the Content Editor and perform a full site republish
  10. Open a new browser and hit your site to be welcomed by the new SC9 base site, http://local.coffeehousexp.com
    Sitecore 9 Install - Homepage

 

Solr Setup for Sitecore XP

Solr

As we continue through the steps for Sitecore Experience Platform installation, the next thing we must have is Solr. This tries to simplify that process.

Background

When installing Sitecore 9 for local development or on-premise for your organization Solr is now the only search provider fully supported. Lucene can still be used to support search within the Context Editor, but all analytics related, and site search scenarios now use Solr or when in the cloud Azure Search Provider.

The following guide will be focused on setting up Solr to support Sitecore 9 on local developer’s machine, where everything (SQL, Sitecore, Solr, etc…) are all installed on the same machine. The steps taken can be used to setup an all in one development or QA server, but should not be used for production setup.

Choose a method

When installing Solr there are many different options that become available, from a direct install, to a pre-packaged solution like Bitnami, a cloud solution, or even a Docker container.

I initially set out to write this guide leveraging Bitnami, as I’ve had a lot of success and quick setup leveraging it, but as it happens old versions of their packages are difficult to find, and Sitecore 9 is tied to Solr 6.6.2. I repeat Sitecore 9.0 update 1 is tied to Solr 6.6.2!!! (I’ve burned a week or so trying to make it work with Solr 7.2 during this series.)

Docker is an intriguing scenario to me, but I’ve got a lot more learning to do before I can successfully get up and running, and I’m in a hurry to start my Sitecore XP 9 life…so this lands me with doing a traditional local install.

As mentioned, Solr is a critical component to Sitecore XP 9, and historical a critical piece to large site implementations. To that benefit there are many write-ups out there regarding Solr installs for Sitecore. The one I found to be very helpful was done by fellow MVP Jeremy Davis. Who has written up Sitecore Installation Framework (SIF) PowerShell module to simplify and streamline the installation you can read his article at https://jermdavis.wordpress.com/2017/11/13/solr-installs-with-sif/.

I’ll be walking you through the steps I took leveraging his excellent PowerShell module.

Steps

  1. Ensure PowerShell will allow for running of unsigned modules by opening a PowerShell prompt as Admin
    Run Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
  2. Install Java if you don’t already have it.
  3. Install Sitecore Installation Framework (SIF), if you need this check out my how-to from last week .
  4. Copy Jeremy’s PowerShell module code into a new file name ‘SolrInstall-SIF-Extensions.psm1‘ from his Gist at https://gist.github.com/jermdavis/49018386ae7544ce0689568edb7ca2b8#file-solrinstall-sif-extension-psm1
  5. Copy the associated JSON config into a file named ‘SolrInstall-Config.json‘ from https://gist.github.com/jermdavis/49018386ae7544ce0689568edb7ca2b8#file-solrserver-json.I’ve created a fork of the config JSON file that includes updates for JRE runtime and most importantly updated NSSM version for Windows 10 Creator Update machines, find it at https://git.io/vAJXS.
    Solr Install - Files
  6. Open the config JSON, SolrInstall-Config.json, in your preferred editor (my recommendation is Visual Studio Code)
  7. Review the Parameters section and confirm that the default values are correct for your installation. Note for Sitecore 9.0 and 9.0 update 1 do NOT change the Solr version. I found I needed to change the following

    JREVersion => 9.0.4, this should be the JRE value used in the folder path to your Java installation, ie C:\Program Files\Java\jre-9.0.4

    NSSMVersion => 2.24-101-g897c7ad, there is a known issue with stable 2.24 version of Non-Sucking Service Manager on Window 10 machines where it will not start the service.

    SolrHost => sitecoresolrMake note of this name as it will be critical to future steps of the install process

    SolrPort – should be updated if you already have an instance of Solr running on the default port 8983.

  8. Confirm the Variables point to valid paths on your machine. I found the following required updating for me

    JREPath => C:\Program Files\Java\jre-

    NSSMSourcePackage => https://nssm.cc/ci/nssm-

  9. Open a PowerShell command prompt as Admin.
  10. Confirm SIF is update and installed by running
     Update-Module SitecoreInstallFramework
  11. Confirming everything installed correctly is as easy as running the following command, at time of writing the current version is 1.1.0
     Get-Module SitecoreInstallFramework -ListAvailable
  12. Change directory to the location of your config JSON and PowerShell Module file
  13. Before running the install the PowerShell Module needs to be placed in one of the known module library locations, found via running.
     $env:PSModulePath

    Solr Install - Module Locations
    NOTE: The psm1 file needs to be placed into a folder of the same name minus the extension with in the location you pick above.

  14. Run the install via the following command
     Install-SitecoreConfiguration .\SolrInstall-config.json

    Solr Install - Install Script
    NOTE: If you end up with the install running and then failing with a message of “Failed to start service ‘solr-6.6.2 (solr-6.6.2)'” then you are most likely facing the NSSM Windows 10 issue, and will need to either manually install the pre-release build or delete what you have and re-run the install job with an updated config such as this one https://git.io/vAJXS.
    Solr Install - Install Script - Service Start Error

  15. Solr should open in your browser or you should be able to reach it via: HTTPS://sitecoresolr:8983/solr
    Solr Install - Solr Admin Screen

Getting Ready for Security in Sitecore XP 9

Security in Sitecore 9 Experience Cloud

The next step towards installing Sitecore Experience Platform 9 is making sure we can easily handle the creation of locally signed certificates.

Background

Sitecore 9 by default is meant to run as a secure application. To help with managing these new security needs, the good (and smart) people at Sitecore have provided some PowerShell scripts to help. These scripts are found as part of the Sitecore Fundamentals module, which can be installed manually via a download from Sitecore, or through a custom MyGet Feed as shown here.

Sitecore Fundamentals Install

As I prefer to script for repeatability and ease of sharing with my dev team, this guide will be based on installing Sitecore Fundamentals via the MyGet feed approach.

Setup PowerShell to interact with the Sitecore MyGet feed

  1. Open a PowerShell command prompt, ensure you are running it as Admin
  2. Register the connection to MyGet feed, at the prompt enter (Note: if you have followed my SIF Install skip to step 3.)
    Register-PSRepository -Name SitecoreGallery -SourceLocation https://sitecore.myget.org/f/sc-powershell/api/v2

    Sitecore Fundamentals - Register Sitecore Gallery

  3. Install the Sitecore Fundamentals module, at the prompt enter
     Install-Module SitecoreFundamentals
  4. PowerShell will ask if untrusted scripts can be ran, enter ‘A’ and hit Enter. (Note: If you have already set this value during SIF Install won’t apply to you.)Sitecore Fundamentals - Accept Untrusted Scripts
  5. Before performing any other steps, and each time before you use the module, you will want to perform a check and update of the module via
     Update-Module SitecoreFundamentals
  6. Confirming everything installed correctly is as easy as running the following command, at time of writing the current version is 1.1.0
    Get-Module SitecoreFundamentals -ListAvailable

    Sitecore Fundamentals - Available Versions

You should now be ready leverage Sitecore Fundamentals as needed in maintaining and installing Sitecore.